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Anonymous asked: Do you think it's wrong to read the saga The Hunger Games?

No. There’s nothing satanic in the book. It’s about a time in the world that could possibly happen when people turn their backs on God and start living in a very communist and socialist society with insanely rich vs. extremely poor. 

Anonymous asked: how do i truly forgive someone i know has repeatedly hurt me intentionally ?

You can forgive someone that has repeatedly hurt you intentionally by trusting in Jesus and giving it all to Him. Forgiveness, however, does not mean you have to continually allow this person who harms and hurts you to victimize you and treat you terribly. You can forgive them and move on and cut the person out of your life. Give it to Jesus. 

"Forgive and forget" is kind of a tricky phrase. Many people think that to "forgive and forget" means we have to selectively delete the offense from our memories and pretend it didn’t happen. Obviously, that’s an impossibility, because our brains aren’t hard drives or gig sticks we can just wipe clean, and pretending is just that—pretending.

The Bible doesn’t use the phrase “forgive and forget,” but the implied concept is one of continual forgiveness without holding grudges. That is, when you forgive someone, it’s like you’re giving them a clean slate. Why should we give anyone a clean slate? Because God does. He pardons our sins and overlooks everything we do against Him so that we can gain an eternal inheritance. “He does not retain His anger forever, because He delights in steadfast love.” (Micah 7:18)

Follow Jesus’ Example

God forgives our sins constantly, so why shouldn’t we do the same? If a friend has hurt me, and I have granted her forgiveness, I can no longer hold the offenses against her. Even though I remember the issue that was so hurtful, I remember it with no weight, no pressure to hang on to it. I try to let it go and move on with life. Yes, it’s hard to do. We really like to bring up old stuff sometimes because that can cause the biggest sting. But bringing up past pain is never helpful to a friendship.

When the disciple Peter asked Jesus, “Lord, how often am I to forgive my brother when he sins against me? Seven times?” Jesus answered, “I tell you, not seven times, but seventy times seven.” (Matthew 18:22) He’s not saying that we keep a tally of times we forgive and stop after 490. In Jesus’ time, saying “seventy times seven” implied a number that can’t be counted. Like when you say, “I’ve told you a million times!” You don’t mean it literally, but perhaps you mean that you’ve said it more times than you can count.

We should not keep track of how many times we are wronged or how many times we have forgiven someone who has offended us. Forgiveness is godly, and a forgiving heart overlooks offenses. If God can forgive us every day when He could easily strike us down for sinning against Him, how much more should we forgive others and not dish out constant punishment?

How NOT to Forget

Giving a person a clean slate is not the same as merely covering up an offense and pretending it’ll get better on its own. As I said earlier, it’s not like we can just hit “delete” on memories—especially painful ones. Change only happens in your heart when you make the decision not to hold a grudge. Grudges will only end up hurting both of you.

One night, my boyfriend and I were goofing off with our church group in the gym when he took me aside to talk to me. Before I knew it, he had left without a real explanation as to why, leaving me with people I didn’t really know that well. When he didn’t return for the whole night, I became miserable that he had abandoned me and didn’t tell me why he was leaving. I could barely return to socializing with the others.

I moped for the rest of the festivities. When I got home, my boyfriend was waiting for me outside and apologized. Even though I was hurt and confused, I told him that I forgave him, but I didn’t really mean it. I tried to slap on an amnesia Band-Aid in hopes that it would just go away.

Soon, the black mark on my heart was visible again. The amnesia Band-Aid was insufficient for this gaping wound that had developed as I stewed over all the times he had hurt me. Sharp memories bled through until I flinched from flashbacks or balked at suggestions of another game night. I shut out my friends when they asked what was wrong, then convinced myself that they’d deserted me.

Finding True Healing

Real healing can only come with true openness to release the person who has wronged us. We must throw out all vengeful feelings and bitterness, allowing our hearts to soften toward them with honest forgiveness. In doing so, we become free to love others fully and reap heavenly rewards (Ephesians 4:322 John 1:8).

It hurts to make an attempt at incomplete forgiveness. Trust me, I know. It seems silly now, and I realize it took far too long, but in the end, I did forgive my boyfriend for leaving me that night. The memories are still there and still hurt, but I don’t hold it against him anymore.

Ephesians 4:32 says, “Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ God forgave you.” God wants all His children to forgive each other, just as He has forgiven us through Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross. He treats us as though we never sinned at all and doesn’t hold our sins against us. So, in a sense, He “forgives and forgets.”

In the same way, to truly forgive someone, we need to act as though they never hurt us in the first place. Yes, we still remember the offense, and yes, we can learn from it, but to truly forgive, we treat the person as though it never happened.

Anonymous asked: I think im gay..Ive felt like this for most of my life but Ive never really accepted it and probably never will. It makes me think whether homosexuality is given to me as a curse by God or maybe there's a reason why I'm like this? I just feel stuck at this point, I don't know what to do. I am very hopeful and willing to change, but I jst dont know where to start, nor what to do. It would be really helpful if I could be guided to God's path.

God doesn’t curse anyone nor does he tempt anyone. He doesn’t inflict sin on people at all. Regardless of the cause of it, whether it be temptation, over-saturation of media that influences many young people to believe they’re gay, friend/family influences, etc., however you feel you were born, you have to be born again in Jesus. I’m born with a predisposition to addiction and I gave into it before I found Jesus. When I became born again, asked Jesus into my heart as my Savior, asked Him to forgive my sins because He is God, I repented from my past ways and predispositions. I don’t do drugs or drink at all.  Do I feel tempted to now and then? Sometimes…not so bad anymore.. but it’s not God that tempts me, it’s the devil.  I know men who have a predisposition to cheating of their wives. Their fathers and grandfathers and great grandfathers all did it. Does that mean that the man can’t help himself and has no choice but to cheat? However tempted he may be to do so, he must fight it and be faithful to his wife and the vows they took before God.  All sin is equal in the eyes of the Lord. As people born sinners because of what Adam and Eve did, we all have to fight our sin nature every single day. The devil hates us humans. He hates us because we were created in God’s image and he wasn’t. He hates us because we were given the opportunity to be forgiven through Jesus Christ and he wasn’t.  Don’t forget that the devil hates us and is in this world with the sole purpose of tempting us and leading us away from God.  Ephesians 6:12 says “For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.”.  Fighting against sin, against evil, against genetic predispositions and the temptations that satan puts before us every single day is not an easy battle but with faithfulness and JESUS, we can win that battle.  

Don’t lose hope, go to Jesus, read your Bible and turn to Him. Don’t worry about having any romantic relationships with anyone right now. Work on building your relationship with Jesus Christ. You are not alone. There are many going through what you went through. This was a touching post I read about someone in the same struggle you’re in: http://www.simplyheavenlyfood.com/2012/05/he-can-break-your-chains-and-set-you.html

A Harvard study on twins shows that babies aren’t born gay: http://simplyheavenlyfood.tumblr.com/post/85562151786/i-made-a-post-about-gay-is-not-a-genetic-inheritance


You can do all things through Christ who strengthens you (Philippians 4:13)

This is Roman, an ex gay who is now a Christian. You should message him. He knows EXACTLY what you’re going through http://romangm1.tumblr.com/

Why Does God Allow Evil? (Got Questions Question of the Week)(QOTW)

Question: “Why does God allow evil?”

Answer:
The Bible describes God as holy (Isaiah 6:3), righteous (Psalm 7:11), just (Deuteronomy 32:4), and sovereign (Daniel 4:17-25). These attributes tell us the following about God: (1) God is capable of preventing evil, and (2) God desires to rid the universe of evil. So, if both of these are true, why does God allow evil? If God has the power to prevent evil and desires to prevent evil, why does He still allow evil? Perhaps a practical way to look at this question would be to consider some alternative ways people might have God run the world:

1) God could change everyone’s personality so that they cannot sin. This would also mean that we would not have a free will. We would not be able to choose right or wrong because we would be “programmed” to only do right. Had God chosen to do this, there would be no meaningful relationships between Him and His creation.

Instead, God made Adam and Eve innocent but with the ability to choose good or evil. Because of this, they could respond to His love and trust Him or choose to disobey. They chose to disobey. Because we live in a real world where we can choose our actions but not their consequences, their sin affected those who came after them (us). Similarly, our decisions to sin have an impact on us and those around us and those who will come after us.

2) God could compensate for people’s evil actions through supernatural intervention 100 percent of the time. God would stop a drunk driver from causing an automobile accident. God would stop a lazy construction worker from doing a substandard job on a house that would later cause grief to the homeowners. God would stop a father who is addicted to drugs or alcohol from doing any harm to his wife, children, or extended family. God would stop gunmen from robbing convenience stores. God would stop high school bullies from tormenting the brainy kids. God would stop thieves from shoplifting. And, yes, God would stop terrorists from flying airplanes into buildings.

While this solution sounds attractive, it would lose its attractiveness as soon as God’s intervention infringed on something we wanted to do. We want God to prevent horribly evil actions, but we are willing to let “lesser-evil” actions slide—not realizing that those “lesser-evil” actions are what usually lead to the “greater-evil” actions. Should God only stop actual sexual affairs, or should He also block our access to pornography or end any inappropriate, but not yet sexual, relationships? Should God stop “true” thieves, or should He also stop us from cheating on our taxes? Should God only stop murder, or should He also stop the “lesser-evil” actions done to people that lead them to commit murder? Should God only stop acts of terrorism, or should He also stop the indoctrination that transformed a person into a terrorist?

3) Another choice would be for God to judge and remove those who choose to commit evil acts. The problem with this possibility is that there would be no one left, for God would have to remove us all. We all sin and commit evil acts (Romans 3:23;Ecclesiastes 7:20;1 John 1:8). While some people are more evil than others, where would God draw the line? Ultimately, all evil causes harm to others.

Instead of these options, God has chosen to create a “real” world in which real choices have real consequences. In this real world of ours, our actions affect others. Because of Adam’s choice to sin, the world now lives under the curse, and we are all born with a sin nature (Romans 5:12). There will one day come a time when God will judge the sin in this world and make all things new, but He is purposely “delaying” in order to allow more time for people to repent so that He will not need to condemn them (2 Peter 3:9). Until then, HeISconcerned about evil. When He created the Old Testament laws, the goal was to discourage and punish evil. He judges nations and rulers who disregard justice and pursue evil. Likewise, in the New Testament, God states that it is the government’s responsibility to provide justice in order to protect the innocent from evil (Romans 13). He also promises severe consequences for those who commit evil acts, especially against the “innocent” (Mark 9:36-42).

In summary, we live in a real world where our good and evil actions have direct consequences and indirect consequences upon us and those around us. God’s desire is that for all of our sakes we would obey Him that it might be well with us (Deuteronomy 5:29). Instead, what happens is that we choose our own way, and then we blame God for not doing anything about it. Such is the heart of sinful man. But Jesus came to change men’s hearts through the power of the Holy Spirit, and He does this for those who will turn from evil and call on Him to save them from their sin and its consequences (2 Corinthians 5:17). God does prevent and restrain some acts of evil. This world would beMUCH WORSEwere not God restraining evil. At the same time, God has given us the ability to choose good and evil, and when we choose evil, He allows us, and those around us, to suffer the consequences of evil. Rather than blaming God and questioning God on why He does not prevent all evil, we should be about the business of proclaiming the cure for evil and its consequences—Jesus Christ!


Read more:http://www.gotquestions.org/God-allow-evil.html#ixzz3D80yyCqa

Anonymous asked: I'm really scared of death and if there's a life after death, Am I gonna be with my family in heaven? (if we're "accepted")

If you and your family are Christian (you asked Jesus into your heart, asked for forgiveness for your sins and turned away from those sins), YES you will be together in heaven whether you die or whether we’re raptured first.  God knows your heart and intentions. If you ask for forgiveness and don’t mean it and keep living how you want, He will say “I never knew you” when you come before Him in judgement. Read your Bible, stay close to Him, live by His Word, Will and Way :) 

Anonymous asked: Are all artists part of the illuminati going to be in hell? some of them claim to be christian, were seen at the church many times and seems really religious etc.. but in their music video, there are few illuminati signs... so what is this? could they still be christian and be illuminati at the same time.

God knows their hearts. A person can claim to be anything they want, it doesn’t make it true. God knows what their truth is, what their intentions are.  You can’t make compromises with your faith as a Christian. Matthew 7 says you will know a Christian by their fruit.  Let’s say a person claims to be a vegetarian and they act like it in front of their friends and eat only veggies and non animal products around friends but go home and stuff their face with a hamburger, they’re not really a vegetarian, they’re just posing as one. Sadly there are a lot of inauthentic people who claim to be Christian but don’t live by God’s Word, Will and Way as the Bible lays out for us.  You can’t be Christian and illuminati at the same time. To be in the illuminati you align with them, do their bidding and get the money and fame that comes with it. It’s the love of money that leads to such things and pride-fullness. 1 Timothy 6 says the LOVE of money is the root of all evil. Anyone in the industry that is part of the illuminati has one goal: FAME/FORTUNE.  As a Christian our goal should be to live for Jesus and to share His love with the world and to stay close to Him.  Matthew 6:24 says you can’t serve two masters. Simple as that.  A true Christian wouldn’t be putting themselves in a position to have to compromise their faith. 

Anonymous asked: Referring back to a previous question about vows: Should we refrain from making any kind of vows (y/n)? More specifically, what about wedding vows?

I already answered this question. No vow or promise should be made if you don’t intend to keep it. Wedding vows, till death do us part means you are promising to be with this person no matter how horrible things may get until death… granted if you get cheated on or abandoned, God will allow you to divorce but you don’t plan for divorce, you take the vows knowing you intend to be in it until you die. 

Here’s my previous answer:  

They are the same.  There are about 30 biblical references to vows, most of which are from the Old Testament. The books of Leviticus and Numbers have several references to vows in relation to offerings and sacrifices. There were dire consequences for the Israelites who made and broke vows, especially vows to God. 


The story of Jephthah illustrates the foolishness of making vows without understanding the consequences. Before leading the Israelites into battle against the Ammonites, Jephthah—described as a mighty man of valor—made a rash vow that he would give to the Lord whoever first came out of doors to meet him if he returned home as the victor. When the Lord granted him victory, the one who came out to meet him was his daughter. Jephthah remembered his vow and offered her to the Lord (Judges 11:29-40). Whether or not Jephthah should have kept this vow is dealt with in another article. What this account shows us is the foolishness of rash vows. 

Perhaps this is why Jesus gave a new commandment concerning vows. “Again, you have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘Do not break your oath, but keep the oaths you have made to the Lord.’ But I tell you, Do not swear at all: either by heaven, for it is God’s throne; or by the earth, for it is his footstool; or by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the Great King. And do not swear by your head, for you cannot make even one hair white or black. Simply let your ‘Yes’ be ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No ,’ ‘No’; anything beyond this comes from the evil one” (Matthew 5:33-37).

The principle here is clear for Christians: do not make vows, either to the Lord or to one another. First, we are unable to know for sure whether we will be able to keep vows. The fact that we are prone to the errors in judgment which are part of our fallen nature means that we may make vows foolishly or out of immaturity. Further, we don’t know what the future will bring—only God does. We don’t know what will happen tomorrow (James 4:14), so to make a vow that we will do or not do something is foolish. God is the one in control, not us, and He “works all things together for good for those who love Him and are called according to His purpose” (Romans 8:28). Knowing this, we can see that it is unnecessary to make vows and that it indicates a lack of trust in Him. Finally, Jesus commands that our word be sufficient without making vows. When we say “yes” or “no,” that’s exactly what we should mean. Adding vows or oaths to our words opens us up to the influence of Satan whose desire is to trap us and compromise our Christian testimony.

If we have made a vow foolishly and realized we cannot or should not keep it, we should confess it to God, knowing that He is “faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.” A broken vow, while serious, is not an unforgivable matter if taken to the Lord in true confession. God will not hold us to vows made imprudently, but He expects us to obey Jesus and refrain from making vows in the future.

Anonymous asked: what is the difference between a promise and a vow

They are the same.  There are about 30 biblical references to vows, most of which are from the Old Testament. The books of Leviticus and Numbers have several references to vows in relation to offerings and sacrifices. There were dire consequences for the Israelites who made and broke vows, especially vows to God. 


The story of Jephthah illustrates the foolishness of making vows without understanding the consequences. Before leading the Israelites into battle against the Ammonites, Jephthah—described as a mighty man of valor—made a rash vow that he would give to the Lord whoever first came out of doors to meet him if he returned home as the victor. When the Lord granted him victory, the one who came out to meet him was his daughter. Jephthah remembered his vow and offered her to the Lord (Judges 11:29-40). Whether or not Jephthah should have kept this vow is dealt with in another article. What this account shows us is the foolishness of rash vows. 

Perhaps this is why Jesus gave a new commandment concerning vows. “Again, you have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘Do not break your oath, but keep the oaths you have made to the Lord.’ But I tell you, Do not swear at all: either by heaven, for it is God’s throne; or by the earth, for it is his footstool; or by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the Great King. And do not swear by your head, for you cannot make even one hair white or black. Simply let your ‘Yes’ be ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No ,’ ‘No’; anything beyond this comes from the evil one” (Matthew 5:33-37).

The principle here is clear for Christians: do not make vows, either to the Lord or to one another. First, we are unable to know for sure whether we will be able to keep vows. The fact that we are prone to the errors in judgment which are part of our fallen nature means that we may make vows foolishly or out of immaturity. Further, we don’t know what the future will bring—only God does. We don’t know what will happen tomorrow (James 4:14), so to make a vow that we will do or not do something is foolish. God is the one in control, not us, and He “works all things together for good for those who love Him and are called according to His purpose” (Romans 8:28). Knowing this, we can see that it is unnecessary to make vows and that it indicates a lack of trust in Him. Finally, Jesus commands that our word be sufficient without making vows. When we say “yes” or “no,” that’s exactly what we should mean. Adding vows or oaths to our words opens us up to the influence of Satan whose desire is to trap us and compromise our Christian testimony.

If we have made a vow foolishly and realized we cannot or should not keep it, we should confess it to God, knowing that He is “faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.” A broken vow, while serious, is not an unforgivable matter if taken to the Lord in true confession. God will not hold us to vows made imprudently, but He expects us to obey Jesus and refrain from making vows in the future.

Anonymous asked: How do we know God is real?

We know that God is real because He has revealed Himself to us in three ways: in creation, in His Word, and in His Son, Jesus Christ.

The most basic proof of God’s existence is simply what He has made. “For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse” (Romans 1:20). “The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands.” (Psalm 19:1).

If I found a wristwatch in the middle of a field, I would not assume that it just “appeared” out of nowhere or that it had always existed. Based on the watch’s design, I would assume it had a designer. But there is far greater design and precision in the world around us. Our measurement of time is not based on wristwatches, but on God’s handiwork—the regular rotation of the earth (and the radioactive properties of the cesium-133 atom). The universe displays great design, and this argues for a Great Designer.

If I found an encoded message, I would seek out a cryptographer to help break the code. My assumption would be that there is an intelligent sender of the message, someone who created the code. How complex is the DNA “code” that we carry in every cell of our bodies? Does not the complexity and purpose of DNA argue for an Intelligent Writer of the code?

Not only has God made an intricate and finely tuned physical world; He has also instilled a sense of eternity in the heart of every person (Ecclesiastes 3:11). Mankind has an innate perception that there is more to life than meets the eye, that there is an existence higher than this earthly routine. Our sense of eternity manifests itself in at least two ways: law-making and worship.

Every civilization throughout history has valued certain moral laws, which are surprisingly similar from culture to culture. For example, the ideal of love is universally esteemed, while the act of lying is universally condemned. This common morality—this global understanding of right and wrong—points to a Supreme Moral Being who gave us such scruples.

In the same way, people all over the world, regardless of culture, have always cultivated a system of worship. The object of worship may vary, but the sense of a “higher power” is an undeniable part of being human. Our propensity to worship accords with the fact that God created us “in His own image” (Genesis 1:27).

God has also revealed Himself to us through His Word, the Bible. Throughout Scripture, the existence of God is treated as a self-evident fact (Genesis 1:1;Exodus 3:14). When Benjamin Franklin wrote his autobiography, he did not waste time trying to prove his own existence. Likewise, God does not spend much time proving His existence in His book. The life-changing nature of the Bible, its integrity, and the miracles which accompanied its writing should be enough to warrant a closer look.

The third way in which God revealed Himself is through His Son, Jesus Christ (John 14:6-11). “In the beginning was the Word: the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:1,14; see alsoColossians 2:9).

In Jesus’ amazing life, He kept the entire Old Testament law perfectly and fulfilled the prophecies concerning the Messiah (Matthew 5:17). He performed countless acts of compassion and public miracles to authenticate His message and bear witness to His deity (John 21:24-25). Then, three days after His crucifixion, He rose from the dead, a fact affirmed by hundreds of eyewitnesses (1 Corinthians 15:6). The historical record abounds with “proof” of who Jesus is. As the Apostle Paul said, this thing “was not done in a corner” (Acts 26:26).

We realize that there will always be skeptics who have their own ideas concerning God and will read the evidence accordingly. And there will be some whom no amount of proof will convince (Psalm 14:1). It all comes down to faith (Hebrews 11:6).

Read more:http://www.gotquestions.org/is-God-real.html#ixzz3C6WNwEFo

Anonymous asked: How do we know the bible wasn't just written by some random person and is really the true word of any supposed God?

Our answer to this question will not only determine how we view the Bible and its importance to our lives, but also it will ultimately have an eternal impact on us. If the Bible is truly God’s Word, then we should cherish it, study it, obey it, and fully trust it. If the Bible is the Word of God, then to dismiss it is to dismiss God Himself.

The fact that God gave us the Bible is an evidence and illustration of His love for us. The term “revelation” simply means that God communicated to mankind what He is like and how we can have a right relationship with Him. These are things that we could not have known had God not divinely revealed them to us in the Bible. Although God’s revelation of Himself in the Bible was given progressively over approximately 1500 years, it has always contained everything man needs to know about God in order to have a right relationship with Him. If the Bible is truly the Word of God, then it is the final authority for all matters of faith, religious practice, and morals.

The question we must ask ourselves is how can we know that the Bible is the Word of God and not just a good book? What is unique about the Bible that sets it apart from all other religious books ever written? Is there any evidence that the Bible is truly God’s Word? These types of questions must be seriously examined if we are to determine the validity of the Bible’s claim to be the very Word of God, divinely inspired, and totally sufficient for all matters of faith and practice. There can be no doubt that the Bible does claim to be the very Word of God. This is clearly seen in Paul’s commendation to Timothy: “… from infancy you have known the holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Timothy 3:15-17).

There are both internal and external evidences that the Bible is truly God’s Word. The internal evidences are those things within the Bible that testify of its divine origin. One of the first internal evidences that the Bible is truly God’s Word is seen in its unity. Even though it is really sixty-six individual books, written on three continents, in three different languages, over a period of approximately 1500 years, by more than 40 authors who came from many walks of life, the Bible remains one unified book from beginning to end without contradiction. This unity is unique from all other books and is evidence of the divine origin of the words which God moved men to record.

Another of the internal evidences that indicates the Bible is truly God’s Word is the prophecies contained within its pages. The Bible contains hundreds of detailed prophecies relating to the future of individual nations including Israel, certain cities, and mankind. Other prophecies concern the coming of One who would be the Messiah, the Savior of all who would believe in Him. Unlike the prophecies found in other religious books or those by men such as Nostradamus, biblical prophecies are extremely detailed. There are over three hundred prophecies concerning Jesus Christ in the Old Testament. Not only was it foretold where He would be born and His lineage, but also how He would die and that He would rise again. There simply is no logical way to explain the fulfilled prophecies in the Bible other than by divine origin. There is no other religious book with the extent or type of predictive prophecy that the Bible contains.

A third internal evidence of the divine origin of the Bible is its unique authority and power. While this evidence is more subjective than the first two, it is no less a powerful testimony of the divine origin of the Bible. The Bible’s authority is unlike any other book ever written. This authority and power are best seen in the way countless lives have been transformed by the supernatural power of God’s Word. Drug addicts have been cured by it, homosexuals set free by it, derelicts and deadbeats transformed by it, hardened criminals reformed by it, sinners rebuked by it, and hate turned to love by it. The Bible does possess a dynamic and transforming power that is only possible because it is truly God’s Word.

There are also external evidences that indicate the Bible is truly the Word of God. One is the historicity of the Bible. Because the Bible details historical events, its truthfulness and accuracy are subject to verification like any other historical document. Through both archaeological evidences and other writings, the historical accounts of the Bible have been proven time and time again to be accurate and true. In fact, all the archaeological and manuscript evidence supporting the Bible makes it the best-documented book from the ancient world. The fact that the Bible accurately and truthfully records historically verifiable events is a great indication of its truthfulness when dealing with religious subjects and doctrines and helps substantiate its claim to be the very Word of God.

Another external evidence that the Bible is truly God’s Word is the integrity of its human authors. As mentioned earlier, God used men from many walks of life to record His words. In studying the lives of these men, we find them to be honest and sincere. The fact that they were willing to die often excruciating deaths for what they believed testifies that these ordinary yet honest men truly believed God had spoken to them. The men who wrote the New Testament and many hundreds of other believers (1 Corinthians 15:6) knew the truth of their message because they had seen and spent time with Jesus Christ after He had risen from the dead. Seeing the risen Christ had a tremendous impact on them. They went from hiding in fear to being willing to die for the message God had revealed to them. Their lives and deaths testify to the fact that the Bible truly is God’s Word.

A final external evidence that the Bible is truly God’s Word is the indestructibility of the Bible. Because of its importance and its claim to be the very Word of God, the Bible has suffered more vicious attacks and attempts to destroy it than any other book in history. From early Roman Emperors like Diocletian, through communist dictators and on to modern-day atheists and agnostics, the Bible has withstood and outlasted all of its attackers and is still today the most widely published book in the world.

Throughout time, skeptics have regarded the Bible as mythological, but archeology has confirmed it as historical. Opponents have attacked its teaching as primitive and outdated, but its moral and legal concepts and teachings have had a positive influence on societies and cultures throughout the world. It continues to be attacked by pseudo-science, psychology, and political movements, yet it remains just as true and relevant today as it was when it was first written. It is a book that has transformed countless lives and cultures throughout the last 2000 years. No matter how its opponents try to attack, destroy, or discredit it, the Bible remains; its veracity and impact on lives is unmistakable. The accuracy which has been preserved despite every attempt to corrupt, attack, or destroy it is clear testimony to the fact that the Bible is truly God’s Word and is supernaturally protected by Him. It should not surprise us that, no matter how the Bible is attacked, it always comes out unchanged and unscathed. After all, Jesus said, “Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away” (Mark 13:31). After looking at the evidence, one can say without a doubt that, yes, the Bible is truly God’s Word.


The truth is not always an easy pill to swallow. Sometimes admitting the truth means abandoning all of the jaded ways you've become accustomed to.

'Jesus said to him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man comes to the Father, but by me.' - John 14:6

My objective is to not only spread God's word and Good News but to help expose the evils of the world.

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